Artists See Things Differently

Artists See Things Differently

‘How did you travel here today?'

I could give you the facts: 'I caught the train from Leeds station. It took eighteen minutes to reach Huddersfield, then walked from the station to here.'

But isn't a journey more than the nuts and bolts? What about the noise and buzz of the train station? The bright colours, neon signs and moving doors snapping at your coat. Who were you sat next to? What were other people doing? How did you feel when you set off, and did this change by the time you arrived? Maybe you thought about what you were coming here to do, or maybe you were distracted by the bill that needs paying or wondering what you might eat for dinner.

The image above was one person's journey from their home to Huddersfield Art Gallery. But what if the artist hadn't asked the question?

Since the dawn of time, artists have commented on and reflected the world around us. but, alongside, they have always re-imagined it too. By drawing together threads that don't necessarily fit, questioning the things we assume we know inside out and watching what happens when you throw a spanner in the works, artists have become experts at imaging beyond what is. They describe it, draw it, build it, invite us to experience it, create it with us, then knock it down and try something else. We're given space, either physically or emotionally, to consider something beyond what we have: To be playful, experimental and to not worry about 'failure'. They see the value in asking questions, forming new understandings and building new cultures and, in seeing things differently, give us permission to do the same.

Given the space and resource, artists can help us to rethink our whole world. But there's nothing wrong with starting small and simply rethinking 'how did I travel here today?'

 

 

 

Re-Meeting Newcastle

Re-Meeting Newcastle